Trail running in Southside

Trail running in Southside
Passionate trail runner and former Associate Editor for AsiaTrail magazine Nic Tinworth gives some helpful hints for those looking to put their best foot forward.

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What do you like about trail running?
There is something soothing about being outdoors on the trails alone, free from the madness of the city and daily grind of life. It’s back to basics: one foot in front of the other. Repeat.

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Three great trails
Beginner: ‘Snake Alley’ aka Tsz Lo Lan Shan Path. A flattish contour path that starts off at Wong Nai Chung Reservoir Park and winds its way above Repulse Bay. Great views and not too technical. Just watch out for snakes.

Intermediate: Dragon’s Back. Be prepared to meet half of Hong Kong at the weekend. Hong Kong Trail Section 8 goes up and over the Dragon (great for views and more technical climbs), but the contour path around the side is a great, flat run if you want to build speed.

Expert: The Twins. Not much ‘trail’ but technical and intense. Start at Parkview and finish in Stanley, or turn around when you hit the road for the infamous ‘Double Twins’.

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Gear
For shoes, go to a specialist trail running store like GoneRunning in Wan Chai or Action X in Sheung Wan for good advice. I also advise running with food and a hydration pack.

To connect to trail runners and discover new trails, join the HK Trail Runners meetup group, www.meetup.com/HKTrailRunners or join the Trail Running HK Facebook group.

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Nic’s top five tips for trail running

  1. Look straight ahead, about 10 feet ahead so you can see upcoming terrain.
  2. Lift your feet slightly higher than normal to prevent tripping over roots and rocks.
  3. Be courteous. Stay to the right; call out when passing if approaching people from behind.
  4. Get a good pair of shoes. Shoes made for trail running have better support, stronger grip and last longer than regular road running shoes.
  5. Play it safe. Tell someone where you are going and take a phone. Note the trail markers you pass so you can tell someone exactly where you are if you get hurt.
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